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How To Pick A Good Hotel For Incalls

By Amelia P

There’s nothing worse than being stuck in a crappy hotel trying to do incalls. We’ve all been there: paper-thin walls, nosey hotel staff who ignore the Do Not Disturb sign, locked lifts that are directly in front of the reception desk, and housekeeping staff who act as though you are asking for a Schedule A drug when you ask for extra towels. 

A bad incall can SUCK, but it can also make you feel really unsafe. It’s hard to make money if you are terrified that you are going to be kicked out of a hotel.

Here are my top tips for picking a hotel that won’t have you checking out early.

There are several options for renting a short-term incall…

Traditional Hotels
Pros:
–   Can provide more anonymity than services like Airbnb (i.e., because you are not having to meet the owner individually – you are one of many guests);
–    Often easy to access extra towels (e.g., by tipping housekeeping, housekeeping cart, pool or gym towels);
– Reasonably secure – plenty of CCTV in lobby and hallways, and lots of staff and other guests around.
Cons:
–    Lifts in upscale hotels often require a keycard for access which means you may have to meet clients in the lobby;
–    Minimal or expensive parking for clients;
–    Generally no access to laundry facilities.

Dayuse Hotels
All the pros and cons of traditional hotels, with a reduced rate. Excellent if you are renting a hotel in your home town and only want the room for a few hours.

Serviced Apartments
Pros:
–    Often these buildings are residential apartment buildings and have intercoms;
–    Laundry facilities, which reduce the need for access to extra towels;
–    Often guest parking is available for clients. 
Cons:
–    Perhaps less secure – may not have as much CCTV and staff as a busy hotel.

Airbnbs
Pros:
–    If you filter search results for self-check-in you don’t have to meet the host;
–    Often these buildings are residential apartment buildings and have intercoms;
–    Laundry facilities, which reduce the need for access to extra towels;
–    Often guest parking is available for clients;
–    Often cheaper than traditional hotels.
Cons:
–    Airbnb is NOT sex-worker-friendly. Many sex workers have been banned and have had their bookings and accounts deleted from Airbnb without notice. If you are going to use Airbnb ensure you have NO links to your work persona on your account, and as a prevention measure, always tell the host that you are travelling with a friend or partner. Be aware of the risk you are taking. 

However, while the risk is significant with Airbnb, this risk isn’t limited to this platform. Years ago, I was banned from a hotel because the intercom was broken, so I had to walk across the lobby to collect clients. The disadvantage with Airbnb is that if you are banned, you can no longer use your account for personal trips. Whereas if you are banned from one hotel you can just book a different hotel. I have heard of sex workers being able to create a new Airbnb account after being banned by using a different type of ID than they used for their original account (e.g., drivers license rather than a passport).

Despite the risk, I still occasionally use Airbnb for work. To reduce the risk, I always select Airbnbs with self-check-in that are managed by large rental companies (rather than a single host who is renting out their private home). You can usually decipher which properties are managed by rental companies by looking at their profile name, picture, and how many other properties they rent out.

–    There are privacy concerns with Airbnb. I know sex workers who have been kicked out mid-stay because the host has cameras IN or on the property. Because of the cameras, the host has noticed a large volume of visitors coming in and out of the property. 

To avoid this, try to only select properties that are managed by large rental companies (rather than private homes). It may be worth investing in a hidden camera detector (though be aware these don’t detect all modern spy cameras).

–    Perhaps less secure – less CCTV and staff than traditional hotels. 

I consider the following when I am picking a hotel for incalls…

Check-In Process
For Airbnb’s, I always select properties that allow self-check-in.

Building and Lift Access
Ideally, if I am seeing multiple clients, I want the client to be able to come up to the room (rather than me having to collect them from the lobby). This means you want a building that has intercom or doesn’t require a keycard.

There are several ways to check the building and lift access:
–    Google the hotel or building name along with “key card”, “lifts”, “security”, “safety” and/or “intercom”. Reviews from different websites will pop up, and you’ll be able to gain some info. Often people complain in reviews if keycards aren’t required for building or lift access because they are concerned about security. Pay attention to the dates of reviews because hotels and buildings can obviously update facilities over time.

–    Hop on YouTube and search the hotel or building name along with “lift review”. There is a weird portion of Youtube where lift-obsessed people like to review the features of elevators. Watch carefully, and you can find out whether the lift requires a keycard. Again, pay attention to the dates of the videos.

–    Turn off your caller ID and call the hotel or building reception and ask. If you’re not confident asking outright, say you have a stalker, and you’re concerned about your safety and want to know whether the building requires keycard access.

–    If the property is a serviced apartment or Airbnb, look through the photos on the listing and see if you can see an intercom panel by the front door. If it is a residential building, Google the building name and search for any rental listings that list the features of the apartments to see if you can tell whether there is an intercom.

Even if a hotel has locked lifts, there may be public access to certain floors without a keycard if there is a restaurant or bar in the hotel. These floors may be a more discreet place to meet clients than the lobby. You can call the hotel and say you are visiting the restaurant or bar, and ask whether you need to visit reception to get access to the restaurant or bar.

Lobby Configuration
Examine the photos on the listing to see where the reception desk is in relation to the lifts. If the lifts require a keycard, you ideally want the lifts the be out of sight from the reception desk. If the listing photos don’t show the lobby, Google the hotel or building name with “lobby” or “floorplan”.

Towel Access and Laundry Facilities
For hotels, Google the hotel name and “extra towels” and/or “pool towels”. If the hotel has a pool, there may be extra towels in the pool area. You should be able to find this out via the hotel website or reviews.

Serviced apartments and Airbnb’s should state whether they have laundry facilities, in which case you shouldn’t need to worry about extra towels.

Parking
Hotels are generally not going to have good parking for clients, other than valet parking, which can be expensive. If I’m using a hotel for incalls, I will generally just look up the closest parking garage and recommend this to clients.

For serviced apartments and Airbnb’s, I will Google the building name and “guest parking”. You should be able to decipher the situation from rental listings and reviews. 

Extra pro tips:
–    If I’m leaving a hotel early (e.g., I check-in at 2pm, do a booking and then leave by 6pm on the same day), I don’t check out. Instead, I just leave the keycard in a visible location in the hotel room and leave. I’ve been doing this for years and never had an issue.

Remember, you are NEVER going to get a 100% perfect incall. Sometimes the intercom is going to be broken, the staff are going to be horrible and nosey, and the washing machine is going to leak. And sometimes you can find no information, no matter how much you Google, and you just have to take the plunge and hope for the best. 

The more you work, the more you can improvise, go with the flow and make the situation work.



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Photo by Unsplash.

Disclaimer: I cannot, and do not, speak for all sex workers. I speak from my experience of working in a legal brothel and as an independent escort in Australia. Where possible I try to be inclusive. However, I can’t relay every experience of sex work – especially if I haven’t experienced it myself.

I use affiliate links for some products in my blogs. This is an easy way for me to track which products you enjoy. I do earn a (very) small commission from this, depending on the product. All products recommended to you are products I truly use and enjoy.

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